The GDPR’s impact on the ability of U.S. litigants to conduct discovery of EU personal data is an issue that has received scant legal analysis. In a recent article for The Legal Intelligencer, Philip N. Yannella discusses the challenges, and potential costs, awaiting U.S. litigants as they attempt to conduct EU discovery under the GDPR.

You can check out the article here.

For those of you heading to Legaltech in New York next week, please join me and a great panel for what promises to be a lively discussion of hot topics in IoT and Mobile Discovery.  I’ve been fortunate enough to have been included in Relativity’s session on this topic at a number of conferences, and this next iteration is shaping up to be our best yet.  Here’s our session description:

From the Iron Rooster to Amazon Alexa: Mobile Discovery and the Internet of Things

Whether it’s missing mobile data (Montgomery v. Iron Rooster-Annapolis, LLC), digital data in a truck (Below v. Yokohama Tire Corp.), Fitbit data (State v. Dabate), or data from an Amazon Alexa (State v. Bates) mobile discovery and data from the Internet of Things (IoT) devices present challenges, not only for litigants and their lawyers, but for corporate organizations, paralegals, and technologists as well. In this session, lawyers and consultants, including a former Department of Justice cybercrime coordinator, a prominent discovery attorney, a corporate information governance expert, and a leading legal industry analyst, will address the legal, technical, and practical considerations of mobile, social, and IoT data, including preservation requirements and data privacy limitations.

Here’s the link to the Legaltech page, in case you haven’t registered yet.  Hope to see you in NYC!