What happened?

Today the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect, ending the data protection landscape as we know it. This comprehensive privacy law applies directly to the 28 EU countries and companies established in or doing business in those countries. Unlike its predecessor, the GDPR applies to companies established outside of the EU that offer goods or services to individuals in the EU or monitor the behavior of individuals in the EU, such as through the use of cookies. The GDPR imposes a number new of requirements on companies and raises the stakes by imposing potential maximum fines up to 4% of worldwide revenue. Continue Reading GDPR is Now Effective – How Will Regulators Enforce It?

Mossack Fonseca, the beleaguered law firm at the center of the international Panama Papers scandal, has announced that it is closing its doors.  The firm cited “reputational deterioration” that has caused “irreversible damage.”

Founded in 1977 by Jurgen Mossack and Ramon Fonseca, Mossack Fonseca had been perched at the top of offshore legal services providers until April 2016, when it became ground zero for a global controversy because approximately 11.5 million of the firm’s internal legal and financial documents were leaked to the media. These leaked documents – publicized primarily by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (“ICIJ”) – allegedly reveal a global system of undisclosed offshore accounts, money laundering and tax evasion, and how the rich and powerful around the world use shell companies to conceal assets and possible illegal activity.

The incident is the largest publicly disclosed data breach involving a law firm. Following the April 2016 publication of data, founding partner Ramon Fonseca and other public sources claimed that the firm’s network had been compromised by hackers sometime in 2015.  Security researchers and other public sources identified numerous unpatched vulnerabilities in Mossack’s website and email server, which could have been very easily compromised by hackers. Approximately 2.6 terabytes of data – including 4.8 million emails, 3 million database files, and 2.1 million.pdf files – were leaked, including client documents dating back to the 1970s.  Approximately one year after the alleged data theft, ICIJ published the Mossack data and set off numerous investigations into the firm and its clients. Continue Reading “Panama Papers” Law Firm Announces Its Closure Due to Fallout from Massive Data Breach

The lawsuit by Austrian lawyer and serial plaintiff, Max Schrems, against Facebook suffered a setback in a ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) last week. Schrems sought to bring class action-type claims on behalf of 25,000 participants worldwide in his home country of Austria, alleging that Facebook violated European Union privacy law when it assisted the United States National Security Agency’s PRISM surveillance program. Specifically, Schrems alleged that there is no adequate level of protection of European citizens’ Facebook data when it is transferred to the United States, because it could be accessed by US authorities without individualized suspicion. According to Schrems, Facebook’s collaboration with US authorities violated the Austrian data protection law of 2000, the Irish Data Protection Act of 1998, and Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament. Continue Reading CJEU Issues Mixed Ruling for Schrems’ Class Action Against Facebook