Privacy Law and Regulation

Assaults on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (the “CDA”)—which shields online platforms from civil liability for third party content on their services—are abundant these days.  On October 15, 2020, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced that his agency, at the request of President Trump, will draft rules explaining when platforms’ efforts to moderate user-posted

The Regulations to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) continue to evolve, in confusing fashion. As background, the AG’s Office had previously issued proposed Regulations to the CCPA in October 2019. The AG’s Office then issued a revised set of proposed amendments to the Regulations in February 2020 and then again in March 2020. While

On September 9, 2020, Washington Senator Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, announced via Twitter that the third version of the draft Washington Privacy Act 2021 (“WPA”) was available for public review and comment. The recently released version of the WPA is the latest attempt by the Washington legislature to pass a comprehensive privacy bill. An earlier 2020

On August 14, 2020, the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) approved in part and withdrew in part the Regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”).  While most of the changes are non-substantive, the OAL withdrew certain provisions of the Regulations and resubmitted them to the Attorney General’s Office for further review.  Approved sections

On July 16, 2020, the European Court of Justice (Court) ruled in the “Schrems II” case that the one of the most commonly used cross border data transfer mechanisms between the European Union (EU) and the United States (US), the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework (Privacy Shield), has been invalidated. The Court reasoned that when transferring

The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) just issued another Advisory pertaining to two consumer fraud schemes exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This Advisory focuses on “imposter schemes” and “money mule schemes, ”which we discuss below.

This most recent Advisory is the latest in a string of pronouncements relating to the pandemic by FinCEN, which has stated that it regularly will issue such documents. As we have blogged, FinCEN issued an Advisory on May 18 regarding medical scams related to the pandemic, and issued a companion Notice that “provides detailed filing instructions for financial institutions, which will serve as a reference for future COVID-19 advisories.” On April 3, 2020, FinCEN also updated its March 16, 2020 COVID-19 Notice in order to assist “financial institutions in complying with their Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”) obligations during the COVID-19 pandemic, and announc[ing] a direct contact mechanism for urgent COVID-19-related issues.”

The most recent Advisory again provides a list of potential red flags that FinCEN believes that financial institutions should be monitoring for, in order to detect, prevent, and report such suspicious activity. As we previously have commented: although such lists can be helpful to financial institutions, they ultimately may impose de facto heightened due diligence requirements. The risk is that, further in time, after memories of the stressors currently imposed by COVID-19 have faded, some regulators may focus only on perceived historical BSA/AML compliance failures and will invoke these lists not merely as efforts by FinCEN to assist financial institutions in deterring crime, but as instances in which FinCEN was putting financial institutions on notice.

Further, the most recent Advisory suffers from the fact that its list of red flags for imposter schemes is best directed at consumers themselves, rather than at financial institutions offering services to consumers: many of the red flags pertain to anomalies in the communications sent directly by fraudsters to targeted consumer victims – information that financial institutions rarely possess.
Continue Reading FinCEN Issues Advisory on COVID-19 and Imposter and Money Mule Schemes

Health care providers, health plans, and others who are subject to HIPAA are sure to have questions about when they may disclose information about individuals who have contracted, or been exposed to, Coronavirus (COVID-19).

To address these questions, the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has issued guidance.  First, it

Just two days after the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced a historic settlement of privacy and security claims against Equifax, the FTC today announced that Facebook has agreed to pay $5 billion in civil fines, arising from its violation of a 2012 consent order with the FTC. According to the FTC, this is the largest fine ever levied by a U.S. regulatory agency against a company for a privacy or data security violation by a factor of 20—and one of the largest penalties ever assessed by the U.S. government.

Continue Reading Facebook to Pay $5 Billion for Violating 2012 FTC Consent Order

New York’s proposed data privacy law failed to materialize in the latest legislative session and is now presumed dead.  New York was one of a number of states that proposed sweeping privacy legislation after the enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The proposed New York law, in fact, was broader than the CCPA