After a pandemic-related hiatus in 2020, a number of U.S. states have proposed new data privacy laws in 2021 – and several are very close to passage.  Virginia’s proposed data privacy law appears to be the closest and is likely to be signed into law by Governor Northam in the near future.  Washington and Florida’s

On January 6, 2021, a bipartisan group of New York state lawmakers released a copy of Assembly Bill 27 (AB 27), the  New York Biometric Privacy Act.  If New York passes AB 27, it will join Illinois, Texas, and Washington as states that have adopted laws that strictly regulate the notice, collection, and handling

The California Attorney General’s Office recently released a fourth set of proposed regulatory modifications to the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”).

As background, the Attorney General’s Office had only just recently given notice of a third set of modifications on October 12, 2020.  The third set of modifications revised the regulations relating to the

On November 4, 2020, California voters approved of the ballot initiative Proposition 24, more commonly known as the California Privacy Rights Act (the “CPRA”).  The CPRA goes into effect on January 1, 2023, and will expand several of the existing protections in the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”).

As background, the original CCPA

On August 14, 2020, the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) approved in part and withdrew in part the Regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”).  While most of the changes are non-substantive, the OAL withdrew certain provisions of the Regulations and resubmitted them to the Attorney General’s Office for further review.  Approved sections

New York’s proposed data privacy law failed to materialize in the latest legislative session and is now presumed dead.  New York was one of a number of states that proposed sweeping privacy legislation after the enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The proposed New York law, in fact, was broader than the CCPA

Recently, legislators in Texas introduced two bills relating to consumer privacy and data protection: H.B. No. 4518, the Texas Consumer Privacy Act (“Texas CPA”) and H.B. No. 4390, the Texas Privacy Protection Act (“TPPA”). These bills bear a strong resemblance to the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “California CPA”), and would lay the groundwork for extensive administrative schemes protecting consumers’ rights to their personal information.

Texas CPA

The Texas CPA bears strong similarity to California CPA. The Texas CPA, which, if adopted, would take effect September 1, 2020, applies to companies that do business and collect consumer data and:

  • Derive at least 50% of their annual revenue selling consumers’ personal information; or
  • Exceed $25 million in gross annual revenue (with that amount subject to adjustment by the Texas Attorney General every two years); or
  • Buy, sell, or receive the personal information of at least 50,000 consumers, households, or devices for commercial purposes
  • The Texas CPA would also apply to entities owned by companies that would be subject to the law. Similar to the California CPA, the Texas CPA contains express provisions governing rulemaking, implementation, and enforcement of the law. Notably, the legislation highlights various consumer rights, including (but not limited to):
  • A consumer’s right to disclosure, from the business, of the personal information the business collected.
  • A consumer’s right to deletion of the personal information that the business collected (with some limited, specific exceptions).
  • A consumer’s right to opt out of the sale of his or her personal information.


Continue Reading Texas Legislature Weighing Proposed New Privacy Laws

Utah Governor Gary Herbert is expected to sign a new privacy law in the coming weeks that will make his state the first to protect private electronic data stored with third-party providers from government access without a warrant.

Under the legislation passed unanimously by the Utah Legislature earlier this month, law enforcement agencies need a warrant to obtain information about an individual from wireless communications providers, email platforms, search engine providers, or social media companies.

While much of the focus over the past two years has been on laws to protect consumer privacy rights, protecting private information from disclosure to law enforcement has also generated attention. Traditionally, the general rule followed, on both the federal and state levels, has been that law enforcement agencies can access information through third-party providers because individuals have no reasonable expectation of privacy when they share their personal information with third parties.
Continue Reading Utah Privacy Law Would Be First to Require Search Warrant for Government to Access Stored Data

New proposed legislation in California, backed by state Attorney General (AG) Xavier Becerra, would amend the new California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to make it easier for private plaintiffs and public officials to sue for violations while further increasing regulatory uncertainty and compliance costs for businesses.  Specifically, SB 561 would expand the CCPA’s private right of action, remove the Act’s public enforcement “cure” provision, and eliminate the ability of affected companies to seek compliance guidance from the AG.

The CCPA is a sweeping new privacy law which goes into effect in January 2020.  It gives California residents substantial control over personal data held by certain California businesses, requiring disclosure of what personal information the business collects, how that information is used or sold, and allowing consumers to control or delete that information upon request.  It currently allows private plaintiffs to seek statutory damages of up to $750 per violation for certain violations, and it allows the AG to seek civil penalties of up to $2,500 for most violations, and up to $7,500 for violations found to be intentional.
Continue Reading California Legislation Would Make CCPA Even Worse for Businesses