Delaware (July 31, 2019) and New Hampshire (August 2, 2019) have become the latest states to add to the insurance cybersecurity landscape by enacting information security laws.  These laws come on the heels of Connecticut’s law enacted a few days earlierNotably, while Connecticut followed the New York Department of Financial Services’ 2017 Cybersecurity

On July 26, 2019, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into the law the state’s new Insurance Data Security Law, which imposes new information security, risk management, and reporting requirements for carriers, producers, and other businesses licensed by the Connecticut Insurance Department (“CID”).  In doing so, Connecticut joins New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Michigan, and Mississippi

New York’s proposed data privacy law failed to materialize in the latest legislative session and is now presumed dead.  New York was one of a number of states that proposed sweeping privacy legislation after the enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The proposed New York law, in fact, was broader than the CCPA

At what has been described as a marathon hearing that lasted late into the night of July 9, the California Senate Judiciary Committee advanced several amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”), but major changes that opponents claimed would have eroded privacy protections for consumers largely failed.  The bills advanced from the Senate

Since the passage of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in June 2018, over a dozen US states have proposed their own privacy laws, many of which are nearly identical to the CCPA.  Some of these proposals have since become law.  Others are in different stages of the legislative process.  To help clients keep track of the status of these proposed laws, Ballard has launched a US State Privacy Law Tracker.  We’ll be updating the Tracker as these laws progress and states propose new privacy laws, so check back regularly. 
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In April 2019, the California Assembly Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee rejected a proposal known commonly as the “Privacy for All Act” (AB-1760), which among other things would have provided a private right of action for all violations of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The rejection of AB-1760 was a blow to consumer privacy advocates. A similar measure, SB-561, would also have provided a private right of action for all privacy violations. That bill has also been defeated, meaning that the CCPA’s private right of action provisions will not be expanded this year.
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Following the speedy enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA or Act) in June 2018, business and consumer advocates alike have been pressuring California lawmakers to clarify the many ambiguities raised by the Act’s sweeping requirements. California lawmakers recently responded to these calls for greater clarity by proposing a slate of amendments to address some of the more controversial provisions of the CCPA, including the definition of “personal information”, requirements regarding information sharing, and the scope of industry exemptions.
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Recently, legislators in Texas introduced two bills relating to consumer privacy and data protection: H.B. No. 4518, the Texas Consumer Privacy Act (“Texas CPA”) and H.B. No. 4390, the Texas Privacy Protection Act (“TPPA”). These bills bear a strong resemblance to the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “California CPA”), and would lay the groundwork for extensive administrative schemes protecting consumers’ rights to their personal information.

Texas CPA

The Texas CPA bears strong similarity to California CPA. The Texas CPA, which, if adopted, would take effect September 1, 2020, applies to companies that do business and collect consumer data and:

  • Derive at least 50% of their annual revenue selling consumers’ personal information; or
  • Exceed $25 million in gross annual revenue (with that amount subject to adjustment by the Texas Attorney General every two years); or
  • Buy, sell, or receive the personal information of at least 50,000 consumers, households, or devices for commercial purposes
  • The Texas CPA would also apply to entities owned by companies that would be subject to the law. Similar to the California CPA, the Texas CPA contains express provisions governing rulemaking, implementation, and enforcement of the law. Notably, the legislation highlights various consumer rights, including (but not limited to):
  • A consumer’s right to disclosure, from the business, of the personal information the business collected.
  • A consumer’s right to deletion of the personal information that the business collected (with some limited, specific exceptions).
  • A consumer’s right to opt out of the sale of his or her personal information.


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Utah Governor Gary Herbert is expected to sign a new privacy law in the coming weeks that will make his state the first to protect private electronic data stored with third-party providers from government access without a warrant.

Under the legislation passed unanimously by the Utah Legislature earlier this month, law enforcement agencies need a warrant to obtain information about an individual from wireless communications providers, email platforms, search engine providers, or social media companies.

While much of the focus over the past two years has been on laws to protect consumer privacy rights, protecting private information from disclosure to law enforcement has also generated attention. Traditionally, the general rule followed, on both the federal and state levels, has been that law enforcement agencies can access information through third-party providers because individuals have no reasonable expectation of privacy when they share their personal information with third parties.
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The Equifax and Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandals, coupled with the proliferation of state privacy and security laws such as the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—as well as proposed laws in Washington and Massachusetts—have increased demand for a comprehensive national privacy law.  Last week, the Senate announced plans to hold hearings to discuss a proposed privacy law.  The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has just released its report recommending that Congress develop comprehensive privacy legislation to enhance consumer protections. 
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