On March 6, 2018, the FTC hosted a live Twitter chat to mark the twentieth anniversary of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).  The stated purpose of the chat was to discuss the FTC’s work to enforce COPPA and to ensure the FTC’s rule implementing the law stays in step with evolving technologies and data collection practices.

The chat began with the FTC pointing to its published FAQs, as well as two recent COPPA settlements: a $650,000 settlement with VTech Electronics Limited, which was the FTC’s first children’s privacy case involving Internet-connected toys, and a $235,000 settlement with Prime Sites, Inc., which focused on how a company can gain “actual knowledge” that it is collecting information from a child. Continue Reading FTC Explains Evolution of COPPA in Live Twitter Chat

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments this morning in United States v. Microsoft, No. 17-2, which presents the question whether a United States court may issue a search warrant to a U.S.-based electronic communications service for email account data held on a server outside of the United States.

Here’s the transcript of this morning’s oral argument.  We will blog more about this case — and the important issues at stake — down the road.

For those of you heading to Legaltech in New York next week, please join me and a great panel for what promises to be a lively discussion of hot topics in IoT and Mobile Discovery.  I’ve been fortunate enough to have been included in Relativity’s session on this topic at a number of conferences, and this next iteration is shaping up to be our best yet.  Here’s our session description:

From the Iron Rooster to Amazon Alexa: Mobile Discovery and the Internet of Things

Whether it’s missing mobile data (Montgomery v. Iron Rooster-Annapolis, LLC), digital data in a truck (Below v. Yokohama Tire Corp.), Fitbit data (State v. Dabate), or data from an Amazon Alexa (State v. Bates) mobile discovery and data from the Internet of Things (IoT) devices present challenges, not only for litigants and their lawyers, but for corporate organizations, paralegals, and technologists as well. In this session, lawyers and consultants, including a former Department of Justice cybercrime coordinator, a prominent discovery attorney, a corporate information governance expert, and a leading legal industry analyst, will address the legal, technical, and practical considerations of mobile, social, and IoT data, including preservation requirements and data privacy limitations.

Here’s the link to the Legaltech page, in case you haven’t registered yet.  Hope to see you in NYC!

Among the more significant changes under the GDPR are new limitations on the use of consent to permit the processing of personal data. Recent WP29 guidelines on consent expand on previous opinions (for example Opinion 15/2011 regarding the definition of consent or Opinion 06/2014 regarding the legitimate interests of data controllers) and confirm that the use of consent must pass a very high bar to be effective under the GDPR.

Consent is one of six lawful bases to process personal data under the GDPR.  Article 4(11) of the GDPR defines consent as: “any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject’s wishes by which he or she, by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal data relating to him or her.” Continue Reading Analysis: WP29 Guidelines on Consent Under the GDPR

The FTC has released its annual report summarizing its activity during 2017 relating to privacy and data security issues.  In its self-declared role as “the nation’s primary privacy and data security enforcer,” the FTC outlines 10 privacy cases and 4 data security cases that it brought in 2017, including Uber Technologies (transportation service), Vizio (television manufacturer), Blue Global (lead generator), Upromise (college rewards program), ACDI Group (an alleged debt buyer), TaxSlayer (tax preparation service), and D-Link (wireless routers and Internet cameras). In addition, the FTC also brought its first actions to enforce the EU-US Privacy Shield in 2017. The FTC report also described its activities relating to international enforcement, children’s privacy, and Do-Not-Call. Continue Reading FTC Releases Annual Privacy and Data Security Update