The California Privacy Protection Agency announced today that it began the formal rulemaking process to adopt the proposed regulations implementing the Consumer Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (“CPRA”).  As part of this announcement, the Agency released the following link to the Proposed Regulations and supporting documents.

The Agency will hold a public hearing for

In a surprising development, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) published proposed amendments to the CCPA regulations recently.  The proposed amendments were initially made public on May 27 in a package of materials to be considered by the CPPA at its upcoming June 8 meeting.  The proposed amendments—which in effect are the draft CPRA regulations—were

The California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) scheduled a Board Meeting for June 8th, in which it will be discussing and possibly taking action with regard to the much anticipated CPRA enforcing regulations.  To facilitate this discussion, the CPPA included a draft of the proposed regulations as part of the meeting records. This draft

On August 14, 2020, the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) approved in part and withdrew in part the Regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”).  While most of the changes are non-substantive, the OAL withdrew certain provisions of the Regulations and resubmitted them to the Attorney General’s Office for further review.  Approved sections

New proposed legislation in California, backed by state Attorney General (AG) Xavier Becerra, would amend the new California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to make it easier for private plaintiffs and public officials to sue for violations while further increasing regulatory uncertainty and compliance costs for businesses.  Specifically, SB 561 would expand the CCPA’s private right of action, remove the Act’s public enforcement “cure” provision, and eliminate the ability of affected companies to seek compliance guidance from the AG.

The CCPA is a sweeping new privacy law which goes into effect in January 2020.  It gives California residents substantial control over personal data held by certain California businesses, requiring disclosure of what personal information the business collects, how that information is used or sold, and allowing consumers to control or delete that information upon request.  It currently allows private plaintiffs to seek statutory damages of up to $750 per violation for certain violations, and it allows the AG to seek civil penalties of up to $2,500 for most violations, and up to $7,500 for violations found to be intentional.
Continue Reading  California Legislation Would Make CCPA Even Worse for Businesses