Federal contractors may soon be required to meet heightened requirements for information security under two new proposed rules issued by the General Services Administration (GSA). The first proposed rule, GSAR Case 2016-G511 “Information and Information Systems Security,” will require that federal contractors “protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of unclassified GSA information and information systems from cybersecurity vulnerabilities and threats in accordance with the Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 and associated Federal cybersecurity requirements.”  This proposed rule builds on new cybersecurity requirements mandated by the Department of Defense for federal contractors, DFARS Section 252.204-7012 which recently became effective. Continue Reading Proposed GSA Rules Will Require Federal Contractors to Meet New Cybersecurity Standards

The Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) Foundation recently completed its second State of Cybersecurity Report, which solicits feedback from hundreds of Chief Legal Officers and other in-house counsel worldwide on a wide range of cybersecurity issues, including cyber insurance, vendor management, and incident response.

Ballard Spahr is pleased to have served as the sponsor for the Report (Ballard also sponsored the first ACC Foundation State of Cybersecurity Report, published in 2016). Continue Reading Coming Soon: The ACC Foundation’s 2018 State of Cybersecurity Report

Add South Dakota (site of Ballard’s newest office) and North Carolina to the list of states considering new data security legislation. South Dakota is poised to become the 49th state to enact a data breach notification law, while North Carolina is considering a very significant expansion of its existing law.

Will South Dakota Become No. 49?

The South Dakota Senate passed SB 62 on January 25, 2018. The bill, which now heads to the South Dakota House of Representatives, generally would require an “information holder” to notify South Dakota residents of any “breach of system security” involving their “personal or protected information.” Subject to certain exceptions, notification to South Dakota residents must be made “not later than sixty days from the discovery or notification of the breach of system security.” The South Dakota Attorney General and “all consumer reporting agencies as defined in 15 U.S.C. § 1681a” also must be notified of breaches involving more than 250 South Dakota residents. Notification to South Dakota residents is not required “if following appropriate investigation and notice to the attorney general, the information holder reasonably determines that the breach will not likely result in harm to the affected person.” Continue Reading South Dakota and North Carolina Consider New Data Security Legislation

The lawsuit by Austrian lawyer and serial plaintiff, Max Schrems, against Facebook suffered a setback in a ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) last week. Schrems sought to bring class action-type claims on behalf of 25,000 participants worldwide in his home country of Austria, alleging that Facebook violated European Union privacy law when it assisted the United States National Security Agency’s PRISM surveillance program. Specifically, Schrems alleged that there is no adequate level of protection of European citizens’ Facebook data when it is transferred to the United States, because it could be accessed by US authorities without individualized suspicion. According to Schrems, Facebook’s collaboration with US authorities violated the Austrian data protection law of 2000, the Irish Data Protection Act of 1998, and Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament. Continue Reading CJEU Issues Mixed Ruling for Schrems’ Class Action Against Facebook

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied the petition for certiorari seeking review of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit’s most recent decision in Spokeo v. Robins (Spokeo II), foregoing an opportunity to clarify the confusion that has ensued since the Supreme Court’s 2016 decision in Spokeo (Spokeo I) on the issue of Article III standing. In Spokeo I, the Supreme Court held that intangible injury may satisfy the “concrete injury” requirement for standing, but lower courts have since struggled to apply the Court’s holding.

Click here to read Ballard Spahr’s full legal alert on this decision.

For those of you heading to Legaltech in New York next week, please join me and a great panel for what promises to be a lively discussion of hot topics in IoT and Mobile Discovery.  I’ve been fortunate enough to have been included in Relativity’s session on this topic at a number of conferences, and this next iteration is shaping up to be our best yet.  Here’s our session description:

From the Iron Rooster to Amazon Alexa: Mobile Discovery and the Internet of Things

Whether it’s missing mobile data (Montgomery v. Iron Rooster-Annapolis, LLC), digital data in a truck (Below v. Yokohama Tire Corp.), Fitbit data (State v. Dabate), or data from an Amazon Alexa (State v. Bates) mobile discovery and data from the Internet of Things (IoT) devices present challenges, not only for litigants and their lawyers, but for corporate organizations, paralegals, and technologists as well. In this session, lawyers and consultants, including a former Department of Justice cybercrime coordinator, a prominent discovery attorney, a corporate information governance expert, and a leading legal industry analyst, will address the legal, technical, and practical considerations of mobile, social, and IoT data, including preservation requirements and data privacy limitations.

Here’s the link to the Legaltech page, in case you haven’t registered yet.  Hope to see you in NYC!

Among the more significant changes under the GDPR are new limitations on the use of consent to permit the processing of personal data. Recent WP29 guidelines on consent expand on previous opinions (for example Opinion 15/2011 regarding the definition of consent or Opinion 06/2014 regarding the legitimate interests of data controllers) and confirm that the use of consent must pass a very high bar to be effective under the GDPR.

Consent is one of six lawful bases to process personal data under the GDPR.  Article 4(11) of the GDPR defines consent as: “any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject’s wishes by which he or she, by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal data relating to him or her.” Continue Reading Analysis: WP29 Guidelines on Consent Under the GDPR

A bipartisan group of Colorado legislators proposed legislation that, if enacted, would significantly change the requirements for how Colorado entities protect, transfer, secure, and dispose of documents containing personal identifying information. The proposed legislation also would expand the types of information covered by the Colorado Breach Notification Law and add additional requirements for companies that have suffered a data breach, such as a 45-day deadline to provide notice to affected individuals. Click here for a discussion of the proposed legislation.

Last week, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) released its semiannual risk report highlighting credit, operational, and compliance risks to the federal banking system. The report focuses on issues that pose threats to those financial institutions regulated by the OCC and is intended to be used as a resource by those financial institutions to address the key concerns identified by the OCC. Specifically, the OCC placed cybersecurity and anti-money laundering (AML) issues among the three top concerns highlighted in the report.

The OCC called for banks to remain vigilant against the operational risks that arise from efforts to adapt business models, transform technology and operating processes, and respond to increasing cybersecurity threats. The OCC stated that: Continue Reading OCC Report Identifies Cybersecurity as Key Risk for Federal Banking System

Welcome to CyberAdviser! We are pleased to introduce this new blog, which will focus on the latest news and developments in privacy and cybersecurity law. We will be providing regular updates and insightful analysis on the pressing cyber issues facing businesses and individuals. Privacy and cybersecurity is a constantly evolving area—you can count on us to provide you with the timely information you need to stay informed.

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This blog is produced by members of Ballard Spahr’s Privacy and Data Security Group, a nationwide team of more than 50 cyber advisers who provide a wide range of legal services to help clients identify, manage, and mitigate cyber risk.